Laugh or cry ?

Being a blacksmith does mean you have to desensitize yourself to the frequent misuse of words like "wrought iron" "blacksmith" "hand made by our craftsmen" et.c, but having been asked to reproduce some genuinely hand forged light fittings, I had a poke around the web last night to see what people were charging for off the shelf "period" lighting and came across this. Must be the most offensively misleading blurb I've come across yet to describe something glued together with a mig out of commercially available mass produced parts.

I'm still considering whether to contact them to complain, but I think it would prove nothing other than what an old curmudgeon I'm turning into!

Have a look and a giggle. Pretty rich price tag on'em too!

http://www.periodlightingshop.com/shop/items.php?Pid=2&Ct1=9&id=69&Cid=&Pid=2


bigfootnampa's picture

Wow! NOT wired either!

Wow! NOT wired either! They're in way over their heads!


Rich Waugh's picture

The worst of it is that it

The worst of it is that it is a piece of crap in every regard and ugly to boot. P.T. Barnum and H.L.Mencken were both right - there's one born every minute and no one ever went broke underestimating their intelligence. Sigh.

Rich


Frank Castiglione's picture

Laugh!

Hi Will,
Laugh! It will soon be replaced by an authentic "wrought plastic" period piece(of shit) carefully crafted by their resident Plasticsmith.
Frank


Gerald Boggs's picture

wrought plastic is already

wrought plastic is already here and sold as antiques. About ten years ago, a lady came into the shop and wanted us to repair a set of antique lamps she had bought at an auction. She even had a certificate as they being antiques. Boss looked them over and told the lady, he couldn't repair them. When asked why? He replied "This is a blacksmith shop, we don't work in plastics" As I understand, she was able to get her money back.

Gerald Boggs


Frank Castiglione's picture

Fine Corinthian Vinyl

Hi Gerald,
I used to collect antique radios until my wife said they were taking over our home. My favorites are the ones produced before the forties; you know, wood, brass, and maybe a bit of Bakelite.The ones that came after were plastic and can hold a high value. I think that the plastic deteriorates and is damaged more easily, so a plastic radio that is in perfect condition is rare.
It sure seems to me that modern society's obsession with facade is a sign of downfall.
Frank