Rebar Gate

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So I have been working on this gate for a while and it is finally finished. This thing is heavy! I used #14 rebar for the frame and 1/2" for the pickets and 3/16" for the wrapped ties. It is finished with a copper sulphate rust patina and an arylic matte clearcoat. The clients just love it and their neighbors are a little jealous. I want to thank this community for sharing ideas as you can see some of the design elements are borrowed from others and some are new. The bolt heads were drops from a local scrap yard that turned out to be tool steel that I could not drill so I had to plasma cut holes in them to weld a lag screw into them to make them work. Lots of extra time that I did not plan on :( In the picture of the snake you can see a reaction from the clear with the copper. It has been fixed and looks better now OOPS!

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visitor's picture

Pretty cool looking gate

Pretty cool looking gate Ray!


Rich Waugh's picture

I don't generally like rebar

I don't generally like rebar as a material but in this case it looks fine. I guess when you get enough of it together and use design elements like the spiral wraps that echo the texture of the bar it works. Good for you, Ray!


Stephen Fitz-Gerald's picture

Rebar Gate

Stephen Fitz-Gerald
Yes Ray there are some obvious "borrowed elements"on this gate,LOL.
Now personally,I am NOT threatened by such an obvious reproducing of my own COPY RIGHTED design,since you are not in my area and are therefore not in direct economic competition with me.
However,having said that,I must stress the importance of ASKING PERMISSION of the source of your "inspiration" in the future when your work so closely mimics another's. I would have said yes anyway if asked. But there are many who would take umbrage at such an obvious copy. I wish only to save you distress in the future and thus advise you of this little code of ethics and etiquette...Looks like a fine job overall. On the lagoon in Belvedere.  At the end on the right is a descending staircase to a lower deck at the water's edge."Kelp" Railing: On the lagoon in Belvedere. At the end on the right is a descending staircase to a lower deck at the water's edge.


Rich Waugh's picture

Stephen, While it is

Stephen,

While it is possible that Ray was inspired by seeing your railing photo at some earlier time, I'd be hard pressed to call what he has done a copy in any way. Wavy vertical elements aren't unique by any means. Essentially calling his work a piece of plagiarism is going a bit far, I think.

Rich


Stephen Fitz-Gerald's picture

rebar gate

Stephen Fitz-Gerald
Dear Rich,
I am in consensus with your generalization that vertical wavy elements aren't unique.
I would certainly validate that my view is subjective,but from where I sit there is a conspicuous similarity and I felt a gentle "heads up" was warranted. I have no animosity on this issue whatsoever but sincerely wish to save Ray from potential future harm.My words were intended in an avuncular way.I think he's made a fine gate which exhibits good craftsmanship. If you as moderator think my words seemed not gentle, too strident or disrespectful in any way and I have offended Ray, I apologize to him publicly for that was not my intent. I do however hold to the underlying belief that such similarity should be avoided.I think this forum is a rich fertile ground for learning by all participants and I gave what I thought to be useful input in the spirit of constructive criticism. This same spirit I would expect and accept from all others here even if it were contrary to my own beliefs.
With respect


RayNTucson's picture

No apology required!

Thanks for the input guys! The ideas that I took inspiration from were the ties from one picket to another. The vertical elements mimic the look of the ocotillo cactus that is native to the Sonoran desert where I live. And after looking at the Kelp railing I can see how it would appear to be similar. I agree that if I were in someones immediate area it would be wise to ask permission. I also believe that if you are willing to share your work on a public forum you should expect some crossover of ideas in others work. If someone feels so strongly that they don't want their ideas to be duplicated they should not post them to save themselves from that frustration. As far as my designs go I would not be upset if someone were to borrow some elements for their work. And thank you for the apology that was not necessary because you were only looking out for all of us on this forum.


Stephen Fitz-Gerald's picture

Rebar Gate

Stephen Fitz-Gerald
Well spoken Ray,
I certainly take you at your word. I know there are synchronicities and coincidences in design all the time.


visitor's picture

I like rebar and use it

I like rebar and use it often! Most of the time I hammer out the ridges and give it a fully hammered texture... but sometimes I leave a little showing. The stuff I get behaves nicely and is pretty strong. I like it for things like lightweight pry bars and hooks. I agree with Rich though that this is about the first piece I have seen where the original texture of the rebar does not detract... this looks nice!


RayNTucson's picture

I use a knotted wire brush

I use a knotted wire brush on the rebar to soften the ribs a little. It smoothes it out and gets the scale off. I have made large ocotillo cactus and some business card holders with it before but this is the first time doing a piece of this quality. The photo below is of one of the card holders made with material found at the local scrap yard so it is all rescued metal. I left this one in the pickle juice a little too long and it got some pits in it but it still looks OK.

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scottster's picture

Great looking gate

The gate is awesome, how long did it take to build?

Regards,
Scott

http://www.slowraincreations.com


RayNTucson's picture

This gate had to be aproved

This gate had to be aproved through an H.O.A. so it took longer than it should have. I did the concept drawing in May and I did the final install on Halloween. There are about 50 hours of actual work time and many more hours of daydreaming about how to make it work.


Rob Sigafoos's picture

Ray- This is a delightful

Ray-
This is a delightful gate! I also don't usually like rebar (perhaps, subconsciously, because I personally hate working with the stuff), but your design is wonderful and the execution is very well crafted. This brings a wide smile to my face!
Rob


RayNTucson's picture

Smiles are what its all

Smiles are what its all about. The rebar wasn't that bad to work with. It bends quite easily with a little heat and didn't start to split unless I overheated it. The pickets were formed with my ring roller and the ties were heated with the oxy/acetylene torch as I bent them around the pickets. That probably took the most time to get right. The handles were bent around a piece of 1" tubing. This gate is heavy but with the oversize hinges it moves very easily. Thanks for the good comments!